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Porsche classic crocodile leather Keys Cases first 911, 930, G Modell, 964, 993, 996, 997

Porsche classic crocodile leather Keys Cases first 911, 930, G Modell, 964, 993, 996, 997

Porsche classic crocodile Keys Cases / FOBS, 550, 550 Spider, 356, 356 Speedster, 912, 914, 916,917,924, 924 turbo, 911 G Modell, 911 Carrera, 911 Turbo, 930 Turbo, 964 Carrea, 968, 993 Turbo, 996, 997 Carrera, 997 Turbo

All custom-made classic key Porsche Fobs are handmade and hand-stitched to suit your exact design needs. We use only the highest quality leather materials. 
You can email us prior to making the classic Porsche Key Case to let us know whether you would like a belly cut, flank cut, or back cut and whether you would like larger scales or smaller scales. 

  • Crocodile Leather 
  • Lizard 
  • Ostrich
  • Python

For Following Cars: 550, 550 Spider, 356, 356 Speedster, 912, 914, 916,917,924, 924 turbo, 911 G Modell, 911 Carrera, 911 Turbo, 930 Turbo, 964 Carrea, 968,  944, 944 Turbo (959), 993 Carrera S, 993 Turbo, 993 Turbo S, 996 Carrera, 996 Carrera S, 996 Turbo, 996 Turbo S, 997 Carrera, 997 Carrera S, 997 Turbo, 997 Turbo S,

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550 Porsche built from 1954–1956
 Porsche classic crocodile leather Keys first 911 1964 Cases For Following Cars: 550, 550 Spider, 356, 356 Speedster, 912, 914, 916,917,924, 924 turbo, 911 G Modell, 911 Carrera, 911 Turbo, 930 Turbo, 964 Carrea, 968,  944, 944 Turbo (959), 993 Carrera S, 993 Turbo, 993 Turbo S, 996 Carrera, 996 Carrera S, 996 Turbo, 996 Turbo S, 997 Carrera, 997 Carrera S, 997 Turbo, 997 Turbo S,
First 911 Porsche from  1964
 Porsche classic crocodile leather Keys Cases 930 G Modell For Following Cars: 550, 550 Spider, 356, 356 Speedster, 912, 914, 916,917,924, 924 turbo, 911 G Modell, 911 Carrera, 911 Turbo, 930 Turbo, 964 Carrea, 968,  944, 944 Turbo (959), 993 Carrera S, 993 Turbo, 993 Turbo S, 996 Carrera, 996 Carrera S, 996 Turbo, 996 Turbo S, 997 Carrera, 997 Carrera S, 997 Turbo, 997 Turbo S,
911 G Model Speedster
 Porsche classic crocodile leather Keys Cases 964 For Following Cars: 550, 550 Spider, 356, 356 Speedster, 912, 914, 916,917,924, 924 turbo, 911 G Modell, 911 Carrera, 911 Turbo, 930 Turbo, 964 Carrea, 968,  944, 944 Turbo (959), 993 Carrera S, 993 Turbo, 993 Turbo S, 996 Carrera, 996 Carrera S, 996 Turbo, 996 Turbo S, 997 Carrera, 997 Carrera S, 997 Turbo, 997 Turbo S,
964 Porsche from 1988–1993
 Porsche classic crocodile leather Keys Cases 993 For Following Cars: 550, 550 Spider, 356, 356 Speedster, 912, 914, 916,917,924, 924 turbo, 911 G Modell, 911 Carrera, 911 Turbo, 930 Turbo, 964 Carrea, 968,  944, 944 Turbo (959), 993 Carrera S, 993 Turbo, 993 Turbo S, 996 Carrera, 996 Carrera S, 996 Turbo, 996 Turbo S, 997 Carrera, 997 Carrera S, 997 Turbo, 997 Turbo S,
993 Porsche last air cooled Porsche Motor from  1993–1998
 Porsche classic crocodile leather Keys Cases for 996 For Following Cars: 550, 550 Spider, 356, 356 Speedster, 912, 914, 916,917,924, 924 turbo, 911 G Modell, 911 Carrera, 911 Turbo, 930 Turbo, 964 Carrea, 968,  944, 944 Turbo (959), 993 Carrera S, 993 Turbo, 993 Turbo S, 996 Carrera, 996 Carrera S, 996 Turbo, 996 Turbo S, 997 Carrera, 997 Carrera S, 997 Turbo, 997 Turbo S,
996 Porsche from  1997–2005
 Porsche classic crocodile leather Keys Cases For Following Cars: 550, 550 Spider, 356, 356 Speedster, 912, 914, 916,917,924, 924 turbo, 911 G Modell, 911 Carrera, 911 Turbo, 930 Turbo, 964 Carrea, 968,  944, 944 Turbo (959), 993 Carrera S, 993 Turbo, 993 Turbo S, 996 Carrera, 996 Carrera S, 996 Turbo, 996 Turbo S, 997 Carrera, 997 Carrera S, 997 Turbo, 997 Turbo S,
997 Porsche from  2004–2011

History of Porsche in the City Stuttgart in Germany 

Porsche AG, also known as Dr. Ing. h.c. F. Porsche Aktiengesellschaft, is a German automaker with its headquarters in Stuttgart-Zuffenhausen. Ferdinand Porsche established a design studio in Stuttgart in 1931, and after 1945, it was combined with a manufacturing facility that produced mostly sports vehicles.

Porsche AG, which joined the Volkswagen group in 2009, is not to be confused with Porsche Automobil Holding, a publicly traded company with headquarters in Stuttgart and the biggest stakeholder of Volkswagen AG since 2009.

Beginnings

Ferdinand Porsche opened his own design studio at Kronenstrasse 24 in Stuttgart on December 1st, 1930. In 1893, he had started working as a mechanic for Béla Egger & Co., a company that made electric motors. [4] At the age of 22, he was appointed chief of the testing division in 1897. He worked on the Porsche P1, an electric automobile developed by Egger-Lohner, among other things. Porsche was hired as a designer by the k.u.k. Hofwagenfabrik Ludwig Lohner & Co. in Vienna towards the end of 1899. Porsche created a replacement model for the electric carriage in the same year, and it was shown at the 1900 Paris World's Fair under the name "Lohner-Porsche." Porsche left the business after eight years[5] and spent the next 17 years as technical director (chief designer) of Austro-Daimler in Wiener Neustadt. Porsche served as the head of the design office and a member of the board of the Daimler-Motoren-Gesellschaft in Stuttgart for six years beginning in April 1923. (from 1926 part of Daimler-Benz AG). Steyr-head Werke's designer was Porsche's final employer. [6] Porsche received honorary doctorates from the Technical Universities of Vienna and Stuttgart in recognition of his contributions to design. In 1931, the titles were given to the business Dr. Ing. h. c. F. Porsche GmbH.

1931 to 1937: Dr. Ing. h.c. F. Porsche GmbH

The design studio at Kronenstrasse 24 in Stuttgart was registered as Dr. Ing. h.c. F. Porsche GmbH, Konstruktion und Beratung für Motoren- and Fahrzeugbau on April 25, 1931. (Design and Consulting for Engine and Vehicle Construction). Adolf Rosenberger, a businessman and racing driver, had 10% of the company's stock, while his son-in-law, the Viennese lawyer Anton Pich, held 10%. Porsche retained the remaining 80% of the shares. [7] Ferry Porsche was one of the company's initial workers, along with head engineer Karl Rabe, transmission expert Karl Fröhlich, engine expert Josef Kales, and axle design expert Josef Zahradnik. Later collaborators included engine engineer Franz Xaver Reimspieß, aerodynamics expert Josef Mickl, and automobile designer Erwin Komenda. Adolf Rosenberger made sure that the office made it through the early stages financially despite a dearth of orders and Porsche's propensity for extravagant designs, but he departed the administration again as early as January 31, 1933. [8] The new commercial director and a new stakeholder with a 10% interest was Baron Hans von Veyder-Malberg. Ferry Porsche received the nominal value of Rosenberger's 10% ownership stake in Porsche GmbH on July 30, 1935.

The Porsche Type 12 compact automobile was created by the design office in 1931 for Zündapp in Nuremberg as one of the earliest orders. Porsche's advancements were counted starting with the 7, perhaps to boost customer trust in the fledgling business. [11] A one-liter engine was originally intended for the vehicle. [12] The prototype's 1.2-liter, five-cylinder radial engine was water-cooled. [13] Later, the Porsche Type 32 mid-size automobile was created for NSU, which already shared many characteristics with the VW Beetle. For example, the NSU Porsche featured the same air-cooled four-cylinder boxer engine in the back and the famous Porsche torsion bar suspension. The orders were not particularly profitable since these cars did not enter series production because of the extremely high manufacturing costs. The same was true for the development of a two-liter hiking touring automobile. However, the Auto-Union racing vehicle, which had a 16-cylinder mid-engine (originally referred to as a rear-engine) from 1933 forward, was developed with great success. The March 1933 agreement between Auto-Union and the racing team came to an end in June 1936. [14]

For the Reich Association of the Automotive Industry, the office began designing the German Volkswagen in 1934. This vehicle was eventually known as the KdF car or VW Beetle. The newly established Volkswagenwerk G.m.b.H., of which Ferdinand Porsche served as chief executive and a member of the supervisory board, acquired this order, and the position that resulted, became the design office's economic foundation.

1937 to 1972: Dr. Ing. h.c. F. Porsche KG

Veyder-Malberg received payment in December 1937 as a result of the favorable profit position. As a result, the engineering office's legal structure was altered to a limited partnership, which it retained up until 1972. The office relocated to its current Stuttgart-Zuffenhausen location. In addition to Ferdinand Porsche, the partners at this point included his kids Ferry (15%) and Louise (5%) as well as their spouse Anton Piech (10%). [15] For instance, the Volkswagenwerk paid Porsche KG bills totalling RM 20.6 million between 1937 and April 1945 for research and testing costs as well as other services. [16] For DAF, work on the Volkstraktor started in 1937 as well. Porsche created ideas for the Kübelwagen and Schwimmwagen, among other things, during World War II. [17] The Army Ordnance Agency hired the design office to develop a medium-weight combat tank towards the end of 1939, however this project was abruptly abandoned in favor of heavier tank variants. Additionally, Porsche obtained orders for these tank classes' development (Tiger, Elefant and Maus). [18]

However, a complex and unreliable gasoline-electric powertrain arrangement as well as increased manufacturing costs prevented the Porsche Tiger from being produced. [19]

The development facility was situated on a roughly 30,000 square meter piece of land and had been constructed in Zuffenhausen since 1937. It was furnished with its own carpentry, sheet metal working, paint shop, and assembly halls, among other things. There were 656 persons worked there in the summer of 1944. Additionally, there were probably around 300 prisoners of war and forced laborers overall throughout the conflict. [20] The business had a profit of around RM 2.1 million in 1944. [21]

The administration, together with the most crucial documents, agreements, and design plans, as well as a portion of the manufacturing, were moved to the Porsche factory in Gmünd, Austria, starting in the summer of 1944. Additionally, in the last few months of the war, Austria received 931,000 RM. [22] The 356 No. 1 Roadster and its production version 356 were both created starting in July 1947 by the Austrian Porsche-Konstruktionen-Ges.m.b.H. under the supervision of Ferry Porsche, Ferdinand Porsche's son. Up until 1950, the latter was constructed in a brief run of only 47 apartments.

When Ferry Porsche's father was a prisoner of war in France in 1947, he succeeded him as chairman of the Stuttgart corporation. Ferry's suspicions of being involved in war crimes were rapidly dispelled, allowing him to go on with his company and, in part, pay his father's bail together with his sister Louise Pich.

Porsche and the Volkswagenwerk signed their first contract in September 1948, with Heinrich Nordhoff serving as the new general director. In lieu of the prior general commission for all VW development work, contracts are now awarded on a case-by-case basis and are fully negotiated. A licensing charge of 0.1 percent of the total list price was also agreed upon in addition to a non-competition agreement for the use of Porsche's patents, which, for example, equated to DM 5 in 1950 for the basic Beetle. [23] A new deal was made in December 1949 with a licensing charge of 1% of the regular version's gross sales price, which was limited at DM 1 for more than 150,000 cars in 1952. For collaboration with VW research work, as well as for exclusive distribution of Volkswagen cars in Austria as general importer, a monthly fee of DM 40,000 - raised to DM 240,000 by 1952 and ultimately to DM 480,000 - was agreed upon, giving birth to today's Porsche Holding. This led to the eventual division between Porsche KG and the VW development division. [23] The Stuttgart auto factory has a financial foundation thanks to this. In 1949, Albert Prinzing was appointed commercial director.

Ferry Porsche inherited half of the partnership shares upon Ferdinand Porsche's death in 1951 and grew the sports car firm into what it is today. Ferry also created the Porsche Crest, which is used as Porsche's well-known trademark. The other half of the firm shares were given to his sister Louise, who is married to Anton Pich.

In October 1950, the Stuttgart corporation that had been put under asset control in 1945 was given back. It was valued at around 1.2 million DM. There was also money coming in from licensing and patent payments. [24] With a total of 400 automobiles, Porsche started producing the Model 356 in Zuffenhausen in 1950. The manufacturer's best-known model, the 911, came first in 1963, with 76,302 total units produced by the time manufacturing ended in 1965. The Porsche Tractor and, beginning in 1958, the Leopard 1 main combat tank were among the creations of the design department. [17]

 

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